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Ahmad HemamiAhmad Hemami received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Tehran and his PhD in System Dynamics and Control from the Department of Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Salford, UK. Dr Hemami has several years of industrial, academic and research experience. Among his areas of expertise are robotics, control and automation, and wind energy. He has supervised several MS and PhD students, and has served as a consultant for industry. He has over 100 journal and conference publications. He is an adjunct professor at McGill University (Montreal, Canada).

A Design Concept for Future Offshore Wind Turbines

Fig1 Windtech Future May JuneTremendous progress can be observed in wind turbines and their technology development, as demonstrated by the increase in their size and power capture capability. The growth in size, however, cannot be indefinite and eventually reaches a limit, from a practicality viewpoint. All newer generations of current wind turbines from almost all manufacturers in the past 40+ years have been based on improving the previous generation as well as making them larger. This is true except for a few models that could not survive or even could not enter the market, for whatever reason.
 
By Ahmad Hemami, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

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Wind Turbines in 2100

Windtech Future March April 21Predicting the status of wind turbines now for 80 years in the future can be not much different from predicting the future of home computers in 1950 for 2004. You can see the latter in Figure 1 and observe such a prediction to be far from reality.
 
By Ahmad Hemami, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

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Drones or Robots for Blade Repair?

wheel4Recently I have come across the development of a robotic device called BladeBug. It is a legged moving robot for maintenance work on wind turbine blades, specifically for offshore turbines. Suction caps stick to a body for which the robot is to do some work. Congratulations to the people involved in developing the device. There are a lot of challenges to overcome for any new development to achieve the expected capabilities.
 
By Ahmad Hemami, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

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Should Offshore Floating Wind Turbines be a Larger Copy of Onshore Turbines?

Ahmad WF fig 1The progress made in the wind energy industry, demonstrated by the design of larger wind turbines to harness more energy from wind, is admirable. All aspects of manufacturing, installation and operation of these giant structures to deliver multimegawatt energy require lots of expertise, ingenuity, determination and hard work. Probably in the beginning no one would have thought of having turbines in the middle of water capturing wind energy, with no complaints about noise, view and other legitimate or illegitimate issues.
 
By Ahmad Hemami, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

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The Race for Bigger Turbines Continues

supply side analysis 2019In the 1980s, the three-bladed, fixed speed Danish wind turbine was the dominant model with a rated capacity of less than 200kW. Forty years later, wind turbine manufacturers are continually breaking the proverbial glass ceiling by launching turbines bigger than we would ever have imagined just a few decades ago. In May 2020, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy launched the biggest turbine ever announced, clocking in at 14MW and with a 222-metre rotor diameter for offshore wind farms. Just one of these turbines could generate enough electricity to power 18,000 European households every year.
 
By Feng Zhao, Strategy Director at Global Wind Energy Council

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Why We Need More Green Hydrogen for the Global Energy Transition

Green Hydrogen WFWind energy has gone from being a niche to a mainstream energy source, providing 15% of the European Union’s electricity demand in 2019 and already becoming the third largest energy source in China. To speed up the global energy transition and to support major energy companies and oil and gas giants in meeting their carbon neutral target, the next step is not only to focus on new solutions that can support system integration, bringing more renewable generated electricity into the grid, but also to explore existing solutions like hydrogen that can work together with renewables to decarbonise sectors where direct electrification cannot easily be achieved.

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