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The PERIMA Project

Unipa Fig 01A Telescopic Wind Tower With Reduced Environmental Impact
A prototype of a telescopic pole for wind energy production with low environmental impact and its lifting system for a 60–250kW turbine and a height of 30 metres have been designed and manufactured. A telescopic tower, which is raised and lowered by automation or by remote control, allows differentiation of the presence of the generator within the landscape over time. The research target is the optimal design of the telescopic coupling, the maintenance of the preload, the rotational decoupling, the pairs of sleeves, the pegs and the bushes of the jack-up lifting system. All the components of the wind tower have been preliminarily analysed through finite element method stress computational analysis. The prototype was installed in Caltanissetta, Italy, and successfully tested.
 
By A. Pantano, T. Tucciarelli, N. Montinaro, A. Mancino, M. Sinagra, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy

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Wind Farm Computational Fluid Dynamics Numerical Modelling

du fig 1Novel Approach for Modelling Wake Interaction Using Reduced Computational Resources
The layout of a wind farm affects not only the total output power but also the lifetime of the wind turbine components. This work is intended to establish a computational framework with which to investigate wind farm layout. At first, a wind turbine numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was validated using wind tunnel experimental data from the literature for the wake velocity flow field (MEXICO Experiment). The physical domain of the validated model was adapted and extended to include the far-wake modelling. The numerical approach implemented allowed efficient model wake interaction effects between rows in a wind farm with reduced computational costs. The capability of the proposed CFD model was shown to be consistent when compared with field data and kinematic model results, presenting similar ranges of wake deficit. The model is ready for engineering applications related to wind farm modelling, considering wake interaction effects between wind turbine rows.
 
By Rafael Valotta Rodrigues and Corinne Lengsfeld, University of Denver, USA

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Borealis Wind Ice Protection System

Borealis Figure 1Field Validation of a Hot-Air De-icing Retrofit
Wind turbine blade icing affects 65% of wind farms worldwide. Icing results in a reduction of power production, safety hazards for site workers and the public, and the potential for increased wear and tear on turbine components. Borealis Wind has created an after-market system which can remove and prevent ice accumulation on turbine blades. Borealis has designed an internal heating system which can be installed up-tower without the use of rope-access technicians or cranes within one week and without interrupting the night-time production of the turbine. The Borealis ice protection system circulates hot air inside the blade, targeting critical locations like the leading edge and end third.
 
By Daniela Roeper and Dylan Baxter, Borealis Wind, Canada

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The PowerCone

Figure 1. Illustration of PowerCone retrofitYou Can’t Create Wind, But You Can Make the Most of What’s Blowing
The PowerCone is a turbine retrofit that attaches directly to the hub and co-rotates with the rotor. With no moving parts, its unique biomimetic design passively channels incoming wind onto the turbine blades to help them capture more of the wind that is already blowing. The result is not just more power, but power from a place where no bigger blade or smarter software can find it.
 
By Ryan Church, CEO, Biome Renewables, Canada

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A Large Turbulent Wind Tunnel

ForWind 1Turbulence and Wind Energy Research in the Wind Tunnel at ForWind
To optimise wind turbines and entire wind farms and extend their lifetime, new technologies and control techniques are being investigated at the University of Oldenburg, Germany, as part of the Center for Wind Energy Research (ForWind). Many turbulent flow phenomena and the resulting problems in the operation of wind turbines can be calculated with computer models only approximately. Therefore, wind energy research in this area is reliant on experiments. For this purpose, a turbulent wind tunnel has been available in the Research Laboratory for Turbulence and Wind Energy Systems in Oldenburg since December 2017. In this wind tunnel, it is possible to test different control concepts very quickly and under different flow conditions.
 
By Dr Gerd Gülker, Dr Michael Hölling and Dr Vlaho Petrović, ForWind, Germany

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Icing on Drones and Wind Turbines

NTNU Figure 1Similarities and Mutual Benefits
A topic that has recently become a focus of research is icing on unmanned aerial vehicles, which in everyday language are known as drones. The wind power industry has a lot to gain from drone icing research. In this article, I will show that there are many similarities between icing on drones and icing on wind turbines in cold climates. The physics of ice accretion on these is very similar, which means that tools validated for drone icing will also be applicable to wind turbine icing. I will also give examples of how drones can be used practically to deal with the challenges of cold climate wind energy, for example to detect icing and even to de-ice turbines.
 
By Richard Hann, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

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Trends, Challenges and Opportunities Related To Ultra-Long Wind Turbine Blades

LM Figure 1Growing Pains and Gains
As wind turbine blade length increases, an array of challenges arise – from the industrialisation of blade production, to the transport, handling and testing of highly-engineered objects greater than 80 metres in length. At the same time, the benefits of long blades are clear, with a 10% increase in rotor diameter providing a 10% increase in annual energy production (AEP) from a wind turbine. Increasing rotor performance, and thus AEP, is the most direct way to decrease the cost of wind energy. John Korsgaard, LM Wind Power’s Senior Director of Engineering Excellence, explores the trend towards ultra-long blades to take on the ultimate question: Is there a limit to the size of a wind turbine?
 
By John Korsgaard, LM Wind Power, Denmark

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