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Repair of Wind Turbine Blades

Leon Mishnaevsky figure 1aTechnologies, Modelling and Costs
Wind turbines are subject to high mechanical and environmental loads, including extreme winds, storms, rain, gravitational load on rotating blades, and temperature and humidity variations. These loads lead to the degradation of wind turbine parts, in particular wind turbine blades. Repair of wind turbine blades can cost many thousands of dollars. Such high costs can influence the wind energy costs in general. Thus, efficient repair of wind turbines is an important element of the renewable energy transition, making wind energy more competitive. In this article, mechanisms of wind turbine blade degradation, repair technologies and possibilities to reduce the repair costs are reviewed.
 
By Leon Mishnaevsky Jr, Senior Scientist, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark

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Detecting Yaw Bearing System Faults

A Remote Condition Monitoring Strategy Can Avoid Uneconomical Operations
 BK Vibro Figure 1 a left  BK Vibro Figure 1 b right
Without a doubt, the wind turbine has evolved dramatically over the last few years in terms of reliability, technology, efficiency, size and total share of energy production. These ongoing improvements are increasingly benefiting consumers from all around the world, making wind energy not only an accepted part of the world energy supply mix but also an important one. Along the same lines, however, there are also stricter requirements for uptime and the levelised cost of energy. The tolerance for downtime and unnecessary maintenance costs is becoming less and less, thus making the role wind turbine condition monitoring plays in the overall wind turbine healthcare strategy more and more critical.
 
By Mike Hastings, Senior Application Engineer, Brüel & Kjær Vibro, Denmark

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Wind, Waves and Wakes for the US East Coast Offshore Lease Areas

Rebecca Figure1Modelling of Wind, Wave and Wakes for Offshore Wind Energy
Sixteen offshore wind energy lease areas are currently under active development along the US east coast and six more in the New York Bight were recently auctioned for bids of nearly $ 4.4 billion. Observational data is sparse in this region so analyses of numerical simulations pertinent to operating conditions, power and wake production are summarised and used to highlight processes that are worthy of further investigation.
 
By Rebecca J. Barthelmie, Jeanie A. Aird, Frederick Letson and Sara C. Pryor, Cornell University, USA

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Challenges and Opportunities of Maintenance for Floating Offshore Wind

Peak wind 1 newFour Strategies for Major Component Replacement
This article details the current state of O&M in floating wind with a particular focus on major component replacement strategies. It summarises year-long discussions held by the expert members of the World Forum Offshore Wind.
 
By Ilmas Bayati, Peak Wind, Denmark

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Impact of Rotor Blade Erosion

KeyWindEnergy Windtech Int Impact of Rotor Blade Erosion Fig01Effects of Erosion on Wind Turbine Leading Edge and Countermeasures
In recent years, operators of wind farms have become aware of an annoying effect reducing the performance of their turbines – the impact of weather-induced erosion at the rotor blade surface, mainly at the leading edge (Figure 1). Offshore wind parks in particular are impacted, driven by droplets of water hitting the blades with high velocity.
 
By Jan Liersch and Bastian Sundermann, Key Wind Energy, Germany

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Uptower Repair of Yaw Ring

CNC Figure 1In Situ Method Makes Repairs More Economically Feasible
A new invention for repairing yaw rings in situ is expected to make a contribution to extending the lifespan of wind turbines. Developed by Danish machining expert CNC Onsite, the patented system means the yaw ring does not need to be replaced, eliminating the expensive, time-consuming and potentially detrimental disassembly of the rotor and nacelle.
 
By Søren Kellenberger, Sales Director, CNC Onsite, Denmark

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Increased Energy Production of Wind Turbines

Albatrozz Figure 1Technology Inspired by Large Seabirds Leads to Increased Lift at Low Wind Speed
Since early 2019, the Albatrozz consortium has been active in the application of a principle that mimicks the landing behaviour of the albatross to increase the energy production of wind turbines especially at low wind speeds. Years of academic research have led to a patent and subsequently to governmental stimulation funding, and now the consortium is almost ready to do full-scale testing on a Vestas V52 wind turbine. This article describes the background story including technical details, plans and outlook.
 
By Eize J. Stamhuis, Albatrozz, the Netherlands

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